Tuesday, January 13, 2009

Tumbleweed 2

Another truck, another sagebrush, this one outside of the library in Hugoton, Ks.

I couldn't resist. Maybe I'll have a collection before I'm finished.

11 comments:

Nancy P said...

This one's for virtualj.

olivia said...

LOL, I love it!

I think you should do the collection. If you get enough, I'll make up a collage for you ... :D

Nancy P said...

lol, Olivia! I hope I see enough of them to take you up on that! It would be so amusing!

Paul Lamb said...

I understand that the iconic tumbleweed of the American West isn't even a native plant. Apparently it is Russian sage. Ironic and iconic.

Nancy P said...

It is, indeed, Russian, Paul. I heard that last August, this area got a most unseasonal rain--right at the perfect time for growing bumper crops of sagebrush. The woman who told me that also said that she later saw a town practically buried in tumbleweed. Oh, to have been there with my camera!

FARfetched said...

No p-mail on the tire this time?

So what's the difference between tumbleweed sage and the kind of sage growing in my herb garden? (The latter doesn't break off and go rolling across the countryside, but whatever.)

bono said...

p-mail, hee, hee, hee. Yes, and I wondered about the difference between sagebrush tumbleweeds and sage herbs. Good question, Farf.

No chance for tumbleweeds here. More snow today and cold!

Nancy P said...

Hey, bono & Far, I bring surprising news! The garden herb that we call Russian sage?

"most horticulturists agree that Perovskia is neither Russian nor a sage, "

So there's our difference, lol.

Manuél said...

russian thistle! reminds me of an old post from the archives.

Nancy P said...

Manny, hola & muchas gracias. What a wonderful memory/story.

Hannah said...

This is a photo of TUMBLEWEED parked next the truck, not Sagebrush. There is a difference. If you compare them both side by side, it is easy to see that they are not the same.